MANCAN2 Trial opens at The Royal Marsden

Date:
01 February 2022

A study trialling a pioneering digital self-help tool to aid men experiencing negative side effects of prostate cancer treatment opened this week at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.

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Bernard Siu, lead research nurse in the uro-oncology unit and principal investigator for the study at The Royal Marsden
Pictured: Bernard Siu, lead research nurse in the uro-oncology unit and principal investigator for the study at The Royal Marsden

The MANCAN2 (MANaging symptoms during CANcer treatment) trial is investigating the effectiveness of a virtual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention in reducing the impact of hot flush and night sweat symptoms in men with prostate cancer receiving hormone therapy treatment.

Bernard Siu, lead research nurse in the uro-oncology unit and principal investigator for the study at The Royal Marsden, said: "Although hormone therapy treatment is effective in stopping or slowing the spread of prostate cancer, it is unfortunate that almost 80% of men experience hot flushes and night sweats as a result of this treatment.

"Research has shown that many patients will stop taking their treatment due to these negative side effects. Therefore, it's vital we find a way to help our patients manage these symptoms."

Hormone therapy treatment works by blocking or reducing the amount of testosterone in the body, which stops or slows the spread of prostate cancer. However, depletion of testosterone in the body can cause hot flush and night sweats.

As part of the study, half of participants recruited will trial four weeks of a self-help CBT programme, and they will be asked to complete a workbook that contains information and exercises to help manage hot flush and night sweats.

Additionally, two virtual group workshops will be delivered by two CBT trained Clinical Nurse Specialists, and participants will receive a CD/audio file that demonstrates breathing and relaxation exercises.

Joseph Montebello, senior trial manager for the uro-oncology unit, said: "Previous research has shown that CBT, which is a type of talking therapy, has had a positive effect in both men and women in managing hot flushes and night sweats.

"By supporting the study at The Royal Marsden, we are helping to continue our vital role in improving cancer care and treatment.”

MANCAN2 is funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Patient Benefit programme and is led by the University Hospital Southampton NHS Trust. Delivery of the trial at The Royal Marsden is supported by NIHR Clinical Research Network South London and the NIHR BRC at The Royal Marsden and the ICR.

Recruitment for the MANCAN2 study is now open. To find out how to be referred for the trial, email [email protected] or call 0207 811 8116 to speak to a member of The Royal Marsden urology research team.